WIFI Flying

Hello ViperEye,

First off, I am no expert. I have a Holystone drone and the way it works is the the wifi signal comes from (is transmitted by) the drone. After you turn on the drone, you will connect your phone to wifi that comes from the drone, not the wifi from your house.

The bluetooth connection links the drone controller and the phone together. The wifi signal that comes from the drone to the controller is then passed on from the controller to the phone where you can see the video feed on your cell phone screen.

At least that is the way I think it works. I am sure someone will have a better explanation or correct me if I am wrong.
 
Hi Syncro,
Sure would be nice if it works as you say. The question I have then is: who's transmitting to the drone? Seems it has to be paid for by someone. Anyway, thanks. I'll stay tuned.
 
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What do I need to get WIFI/Internet connection to fly a drone.
First off, your Drone, your Controller, and your Phone all can transmit and receive Wi-Fi. You can be at Point Nemo (the most remote location on the planet, in the middle of the Pacific…) and your drone will fly just fine, no Wi-Fi for 2,500 miles…

My first Drone was a GoolRC 161, it was only a $30 Drone from eBay, but it was a DJI Mini look-a-like, it came with 3-batteries, spare props, and a hard case. It really was a great little drone and a good flyer. But the camera was all but useless, the photos were Ok but the video stunk if the drone was moving. The controller linked to the phone through Wi-Fi.

However, the one issue with this drone was it's flying time, I got about 12-minutes flight time per battery, which was not bad for what it cost, but when the batteries were running done, the Drone stated blinking its lights (a Good Thing…) but within 30-seconds, it reduced power to its motors and landed, no matter where it was so I had to be real careful where it was when the batteries ran down…

Since the video transmitted from the drone to phone was basically useless, I always flew the drone by keeping my eyes on it Visual Line of Sight (VOS) and never in First Person Video (FPV), so I stopped linking the phone to the controller since I only needed the controller to fly the drone, I then used to phone to run the Clock App and used the Timer set to 10-minutes to beep so I knew that the batteries were nearly exhausted.

Oh, by the way, the Flight App that ran on the phone also allowed me to control the drone without the controller and fly the drone with the Graphical joysticks on the screen, That was the stuff Nightmares are made of…

But the Drone received its WiFi signal from the either the controller or the phone and it had a working range of about 250-feet. I once tested it and flew it out beyond 250 to 300 feet and the drone did what it was supposed to do, it shut the motors down and landed when it lost the signal from the controller or phone…

Bluetooth only has a range of about 30-feet, so it is not used to fly drones outside, perhaps a toy for inside use… But depending on the type of WiFi; 5 ghz or 2.4 ghz, will determine your range. 5 ghz can carry more information (has more bandwidth), but the signal is weaker and cannot travel as far, it's better for video and such. The 2.4 cannot carry as much information (less bandwidth), but has more range.

Hope this helps…
 
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First off, your Drone, your Controller, and your Phone all can transmit and receive Wi-Fi. You can be at Point Nemo (the most remote location on the planet, in the middle of the Pacific…) and your drone will fly just fine, no Wi-Fi for 2,500 miles…

My first Drone was a GoolRC 161, it was only a $30 Drone from eBay, but it was a DJI Mini look-a-like, it came with 3-batteries, spare props, and a hard case. It really was a great little drone and a good flyer. But the camera was all but useless, the photos were Ok but the video stunk if the drone was moving. The controller linked to the phone through Wi-Fi.

However, the one issue with this drone was it's flying time, I got about 12-minutes flight time per battery, which was not bad for what it cost, but when the batteries were running done, the Drone stated blinking its lights (a Good Thing…) but within 30-seconds, it reduced power to its motors and landed, no matter where it was so I had to be real careful where it was when the batteries ran down…

Since the video transmitted from the drone to phone was basically useless, I always flew the drone by keeping my eyes on it Visual Line of Sight (VOS) and never in First Person Video (FPV), so I stopped linking the phone to the controller since I only needed the controller to fly the drone, I then used to phone to run the Clock App and used the Timer set to 10-minutes to beep so I knew that the batteries were nearly exhausted.

Oh, by the way, the Flight App that ran on the phone also allowed me to control the drone without the controller and fly the drone with the Graphical joysticks on the screen, That was the stuff Nightmares are made of…

But the Drone received its WiFi signal from the either the controller or the phone and it had a working range of about 250-feet. I once tested it and flew it out beyond 250 to 300 feet and the drone did what it was supposed to do, it shut the motors down and landed when it lost the signal from the controller or phone…

Bluetooth only has a range of about 30-feet, so it is not used to fly drones outside, perhaps a toy for inside use… But depending on the type of WiFi; 5 ghz or 2.4 ghz, will determine your range. 5 ghz can carry more information (has more bandwidth), but the signal is weaker and cannot travel as far, it's better for video and such. The 2.4 cannot carry as much information (less bandwidth), but has more range.

Hope this helps…
Wow. That is a fantastic answer and a great educational piece to boot. Thank you, LoudThunder. I will now be looking up Point Nemo.
 
will now be looking up Point Nemo.
Point Nemo…

This remote oceanic location is located at coordinates 48°52.6′S 123°23.6′W, about 2,688 kilometers from the nearest land.

Because of its remoteness, it is the "Planned Landing" location for all deorbited satellites. NASA plans to bring the International Space Station down here when it is time…


nemo.gif
 
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